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Isabella Sophia Morrison

Isabella Sophia Morrison

Female 1825 - 1904  (79 years)

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  • Name Isabella Sophia Morrison 
    Born 25 Jan 1825  ____, Cumberland Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 12 Dec 1904  Raleigh, Wake Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Aft 12 Dec 1904  Davidson College Cemetery, Davidson, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I2021  DNA Family 1 Genealogies
    Last Modified 31 Jan 2011 

    Father Rev. Dr. Robert Hall Morrison,   b. 8 Sep 1798, Old Rocky River, Cabarrus Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 May 1889, ____, Lincoln Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years) 
    Mother Mary Graham,   b. Abt 1801, ____, ____, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Apr 1864, ____, ____, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 63 years) 
    Married 1824 
    Family ID F508  Group Sheet

    Family Lt. Gen. Daniel Harvey Hill,   b. 12 Jul 1821, ____, York District, SC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 1889, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Married 2 Nov 1848  ____, Lincoln Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Robert Hall Morrison Hill,   b. 29 Jul 1850,   d. 5 Apr 1857  (Age 6 years)
     2. Mary Eugenia Hill,   b. 29 Apr 1852, Lexington, Augusta Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Nov 1934, Beverly, Randolph Co., WV Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     3. Dr. Randolph W. Hill,   b. Abt 1854, ____, ____, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Nov 1926, Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 72 years)
     4. William Morrison Hill,   b. 17 Nov 1855,   d. 2 Apr 1856  (Age 0 years)
     5. Nancy "Nannie" Hill,   b. Abt 1857, ____, ____, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     6. Daniel Harvey Hill, Jr.,   b. 15 Jan 1859, ____, Davidson Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     7. James Irwin Hill,   b. 8 Feb 1861,   d. 10 Nov 1866  (Age 5 years)
     8. Joseph M. Hill,   b. Abt Sep 1864, ____, ____, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
     9. Hattie Hill,   b. Abt 1869, ____, ____, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Unknown
    Last Modified 31 Jan 2011 
    Family ID F1071  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 2 Nov 1848 - ____, Lincoln Co., NC Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - Aft 12 Dec 1904 - Davidson College Cemetery, Davidson, Mecklenburg Co., NC Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • (continued from Husband)

      And what kind of graduates did such places produce?  "An occasional scholar is sent out from their walls, whilst thousands of conceited ignoramuses are spawned forth with not enough Algebra to equate their minds with zero," Hill proclaimed in his official inaugural address to the Board of Trustees on February 28, 1855. 73  " . . . ninnies take degrees," the acerbic major continued, "and blockheads bear away the title of Bachelor of Arts; though the only art they acquired in College was the art of yelling, ringing of bells, and blowing horns in nocturnal rows."74  D. H. Hill believed that human beings were by nature wretched and sinful creatures.  "Self-abasement and self-abhorrence must lie at the very foundation of the Christian character," Hill wrote in 1858.75 Regardless of its origins, this predilection to emphasize the negative aspects of human deportment brought a certain harshness to Hill's rhetoric.  Indeed, his inaugural address at Davidson was full of vituperative language.  Without rewards for good behavior, the majority of students would "speedily acquire idle habits, and learn to drone away their time between lounging, cards, cigars, and whiskey punch," Hill maintained.76  And as for those miscreants who had no desire to improve their behavior, they would "congregate together around their filthy whiskey bottle, like ill-omened vultures around a rotten carcass."77  It was this tendency toward invective and pointing out the faults in others that caused many people to dislike Daniel Harvey Hill.  But Hal Bridges, his biographer, reminds us that Hill was a man of many facets.  "At every stage of his career, the attractive qualities . . . were liberally intermingled with his prickly traits of character," says Bridges.78

      Davidson College derived enormous benefits from having "Harvey" Hill on its faculty.  In addition to leading the effort to restore discipline, he labored tirelessly to strengthen the academic program.  He persuaded the Board of Trustees to purchase new equipment for the Mathematics Department.  He brought C. D. Fishburne to Davidson and agreed to pay Fishburne's salary for two years if the money could not be raised to meet this obligation -- no small commitment when his own annual salary was just $1705.  It was during Hill's tenure at Davidson that Salisbury, North Carolina merchant Maxwell Chambers bequeathed $300,000 to the college.  Ratchford insisted that this gift was a direct result of the improvements that Hill had championed.  "This I presume is the largest Legacy ever left to one College in the Southern States," said Robert Hall Morrison, D. H. Hill's father-in-law. 79  Anyone doubting the importance of his contributions to the overall improvement of Davidson College need only read what the Board of Trustees said about D. H. Hill when he resigned from the faculty on July 11, 1859.

      That whilst we, as a Board of Trustees, accede to the wishes of Major D. H. Hill, we accept his resignation with very great reluctance, much regretting to lose from our Institution such a pure and high minded Christian gentleman, diligent and untiring student; thorough and ripe scholar, and able faithful, and successful Instructor -- especially in his Department -- as Major Hill as ever proved himself to be since he came amongst us. 80

      In 1859, no doubt at D. H. Hill's urging, the General Assembly of North Carolina enacted legislation which assured that his impact upon campus life at Davidson College would endure.  The law stipulated that no person could "erect, keep, maintain or have at Davidson College, or within three miles thereof, any tippling house, establishment or place for the sale of wines, cordials, spirituous or malt liquors."81  It prohibited "any billiard table, or other public table of any kind, at which games of chance or skill (by whatever name called) may be played."82  The punishments for violating these prohibitions were severe, especially for slaves.  They were "to receive thirty-nine lashes on his or her bare back."83  The departure of Daniel Harvey Hill from Davidson College came as no surprise.  It was widely known that he was about to become the Superintendent of the North Carolina Military Institute in Charlotte.  As early as June 29, 1858, the Western Democrat, a Charlotte newspaper, had announced that the "services of a distinguished gentleman, a graduate of West Point," had been secured for the position. 84  On September 28, 1858, the newspaper reported that Daniel Harvey Hill would indeed be the Superintendent.  "The mere mention of this fact we think will insure confidence in the success of the undertaking," the Western Democrat proclaimed. 85  The impetus for establishing the North Carolina Military Institute was provided by a group of Charlotte businessmen and professionals headed by Dr. Charles J. Fox. 86  "Those gentlemen who originated and pushed forward the scheme are entitled to much credit for energy and zeal," said the Western Democrat. 87  They raised $15,000 by selling stock to individuals and received $10,000 from the City of Charlotte, also to purchase stock.  The voters had approved this financial outlay in a special referendum held on March 27, 1858. 88  Dr. Fox and his associates bought a tract of land about one-half mile south of Charlotte beside the tracks of the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad and hired Sydney Reading, a contractor, to oversee the construction of Steward's Hall, a massive, castle-like, three and four-story brick edifice designed to look like the buildings at West Point. 89

      A festive ceremony was held on the grounds on Saturday, July 31, 1858, when the cornerstone was laid.  William A. Graham, the Governor of North Carolina, spoke to a "large assemblage of ladies and gentlemen."90 Classes began at the North Carolina Military Institute on October 1, 1859.91  The institute had two departments.  A Primary Department for boys from 12 to 15 and a Scientific Department for young men from 15 to 21.  Chartered by the North Carolina Legislature to award degrees, the Scientific Department, which had 60 cadets enrolled during the first year, patterned its curriculum after the courses taught at West Point, which meant that it emphasized such technical and scientific skills as engineering, surveying, mathematics and chemistry, plus the art of warfare.  The influence of D. H. Hill over the educational philosophy of the North Carolina Military Institute was paramount.  In keeping with his gloomy appraisal of human nature, Hill insisted that discipline must be rigorously enforced.  Just as at Davidson College, he held firmly to the belief that young men, unless closely supervised, would inevitably go astray.  "The great sin of the age," he told the Education Committee of the North Carolina Legislature in January, 1861, "is resistance to established authority."92  The Superintendent wrote a lengthy description of the school's mission shortly before the institute opened in 1859.

      The organization of this Institution and the principles upon which it is based entitle it to the patronage of the State.  The instruction imparted is peculiarly suited to our Southern agricultural population; the discipline is of the kind most popular with Southern youth; the prohibition of pocket-money and the dressing of all alike in one common uniform prevent extravagance and the indulgence in crime, and cut off the pride and ostentation engendered by fine clothes; the exercise required in drilling, parading and in guard duty, preserves the health, and occupies that time which might otherwise be spent in vice.93

      As expected, Christianity, although non-sectarian, occupied a central place in the instructional program of the North Carolina Military Institute.  "Will not Christians, especially, furnish the youthful cadets with that sound, healthful and pure literature which the young so much need?", Hill asked.94  Cadets had to attend chapel twice daily -- in the morning to listen to a sermon and in the afternoon to hear Biblical instruction -- as well as go to church on Sunday.  Henry E. Shepherd, a cadet at the Institute, remembered Superintendent Hill's lectures in the chapel with fondness.  "I listened eagerly to the comments of the 'Major' as he read the Scriptures in chapel and at times revealed their infinite stylistic power," he wrote many years later.95

      J. W. Ratchford, who had left Davidson College and had followed D. H. Hill to the North Carolina Military Institute, also remembered attending chapel and listening to his mentor speak.  Hill spoke about politics too.  When word arrived that South Carolina had seceded on December 20, 1860, many of the cadets from South Carolina, including Ratchford, considered withdrawing from school and going home to support their native state.  "Gen. Hill made us a talk . . . one morning, telling us that if we did have a war he expected to go, and advised us to stay at school until it was certain," Ratchford reported. 96  One comes away from examining those fateful weeks in the first half of 1861 with the distinct feeling that Hill, in keeping with his long-held convictions, was willing to fight to protect the Southern way of life but that he sincerely hoped that war would not occur.  D. H. Hill had no illusions about the horrible realities of military combat.  "Recruiting sergeants, with their drums and fifes, try to allure by 'the pride, pomp, and circumstance of war;' they never allude to the hot, weary marches, the dreary night-watches, the mangled limbs, and crushed carcasses of the battle-field (sic.)," he proclaimed. 97  Hill was proud of the South's military tradition.  "The armies of the Revolution were commanded by Washington, a Southern General," he told an audience in Wilmington, N.C. 98  But he knew that a struggle with the North would be long and arduous.  After Confederate troops opened fire on the Federal garrison at Fort Sumter in the harbor at Charleston, S. C. on April 12, 1861, Hill summoned the young cadets to the chapel in Steward's Hall on the outskirts of Charlotte and told them what to expect in the weeks, months and years ahead.  His words were tragically prophetic.  Ratchford recalled what the Superintendent said:

      He warned us that it would be no child's play, and the chances were that it would last as long as the Revolutionary war, and we would all get enough of it.  He mentioned the contrast between the resources of the North and the South, both in men and means. . . .99

      The second half of April, 1861, witnessed a flurry of activity at the North Carolina Military Institute.  A particularly dramatic scene occurred when the cadets raised a secession flag, made by the ladies of Charlotte, over Steward's Hall so the passengers on the trains moving north out of South Carolina could see it.  James H. Lane, a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute and a member of Hill's faculty, described what happened when the next locomotive passed by the campus.  ". . . the artillery thundered its greetings to South Carolina as the train passed slowly by: the male passengers yelled themselves hoarse; the ladies waved their handkerchiefs and threw kisses to these brave boys."100  North Carolina Governor John W. Ellis summoned D. H. Hill to Raleigh to organize the State's first military instruction camp.  The cadets followed soon thereafter.  They marched as a body into Charlotte and boarded trains headed for the State capital on April 26th.  Crowds lined the platform as the locomotive pulled away from the station.  It was Friday night. Steward Hall was turned over to the State as a place for volunteers to rendezvous.  The halls were silent.  The classrooms were empty.  The chapel was still. The Old South was entering its death agony.  Two members of the faculty of the North Carolina Military Institute would perish in the Peninsula Campaign, and James H. Lane would be wounded twice.  D. H. Hill would bring to the Civil War those same attributes which had served him so well during the 1840's and 1850's. Persistence.  Integrity.  Bravery.  But he would also display the irascible side of his makeup.
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------
      Notes

      1 Hal Bridges, Lee's Maverick: General Daniel Harvey Hill (McGraw Hill, 1961), p. vii.

      2 Bridges, p. 17.

      3 Douglas Southall Freeman, Lee's Lieutenants. A Study In Command (Charles Scribner's Sons, 1942) Vol. I., p. 21.

      4 John Cleves Haskell, The Haskell Memoirs (G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1960), p. 40.

      5 J. W. Ratchford to D. H. Hill, Jr., Paint Rock, Texas, n.d., p. 4, Daniel Harvey Hill, Jr. Papers, North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, N.C. Hereafter cited as Ratchford.

      6 Major D. H. Hill, A Consideration Of The Sermon On The Mount (William S. & Alfred Martien, 1858), p. 8.

      7 D. H. Hill to his wife, April 22, 1862, Daniel Harvey Hill Papers, North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, N.C.

      8 Wilmington Messenger, September 27, 1889.

      9 Charlotte Chronicle, September 25, 1889.

      10 Three other children survived their mother and father. Mrs. T. J. Arnold of San Diego, California, Dr. R. Hill, Superintendent of the Marine Hospital in San Pedro, California, and James M. Hill, a lawyer in Fort Smith, Arkansas.

      11 Mary D. Beaty, Davidson A History of the Town from 1835 until 1937 (Briarpatch Press, 1979), p. 108. This book contains two photographs of the building.

      12 Charlotte Chronicle, September 26, 1889.

      13 Ibid., September 26, 1889.

      14 Charlotte Chronicle, September 25, 1889.

      15 C. D. Fishburne to D. H. Hill, Jr., Chancellorsville, Va., February 8, 1890, p. 1, Daniel Harvey Hill, Jr. Papers, North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, N. C. Hereafter cited as Fishburne. His name is sometimes spelled 'Fishburn.' However, his signature on this letter clearly contains a final 'e.' Consequently, that spelling shall be used throughout this book.

      16 Wilmington Messenger, September 27, 1889.

      17 Ratchford, p. 2.

      18 Jeffrey D. Wert, General James Longstreet. The Confederacy's Most Controversial Soldier. A Biography (Simon and Schuster, 1993) p. 93.

      19 Haskell, p. 45.

      20 Ratchford, pp. 2-3.

      21 Fishburne, pp. 2-3.

      22 Daniel Harvey Hill Papers (Davidson College Archives, Davidson, N.C.).

      23 Paul D. Casdorph, Lee and Jackson Confederate Chieftains (Dell Publishing, 1992), p. 319.

      24 Ratchford, p. 5.

      25 The Davidson College Cemetery contains the graves of three sons of Daniel and Isabella Hill who died as children. Willie Morrison Hill (born November 17, 1855, died April 2, 1856); Robert Hall Morrison Hill (born July 29, 1850, died April 5, 1857); James Irwin Hill (February 8, 1861, died November 10, 1866).

      26 Fishburne, p. 11.

      27 D. H. Hill to his wife, May 10, 1862. D. H. Hill Papers. North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, N.C.

      28 D. H. Hill to his wife, June 7, 1862. D. H. Hill Papers. North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, N.C.

      29 Ratchford, p. 77.

      30 Fishburne, p. 12.

      31 D. H. Hill, College Discipline. An Inaugural Address Delivered at Davidson College, N.C. On the 28th February, 1855 (The Watchman Office, 1855), p. 4. Hereafter cited as Discipline.

      32 Major D. H. Hill, Elements Of Hill's Algebra (J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1857), p. 124.

      33 Ibid., p. 151.

      34 Ibid., p. 318.

      35 Fishburne, p. 12.

      36 Ibid., p. 4. John Caldwell Calhoun (1782-1850) was born near Abbeville, S.C. He served in the House of Representatives from 1811 until 1817, as Secretary of War from 1817 until 1825, as Vice President under John Quincy Adams from 1825 until 1832, as Secretary of State under John Tyler from 1844 until 1845, and in the Senate from 1832 until 1843 and from 1845 until his death in 1850. Calhoun was an ardent defender of the South and of slavery and of the right of States to secede from the United States of America.

      37 Western Democrat, March 13, 1860.

      38 Fishburne, pp. 12-13.

      39 For a description of the early life of Daniel Harvey Hill, see Bridges, pp. 16-36.

      40 Ibid., p. 17. Nancy Hill and her children attended Bethel Presbyterian Church, near present-day Clover, South Carolina. D. H. Hill's locally famous paternal grandfather, William Hill, is buried in the Cemetery at Bethel Presbyterian Church.

      41 Bridges, p. 18.

      42 Ibid.

      43 Kenneth S. Greenberg, Masters and Statesmen. The Political Culture of American Slavery (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1985), p. 108.

      44 Ibid., pp. 120-121.

      45 Western Democrat, January 15, 1861. These remarks were made in a speech to the Committee on Education of the North Carolina Legislature.

      46 A. C. Avery, Memorial Address on Life and Character of Lieutenant General D. H. Hill (Edwards & Broughton), p. 7.

      47 Wilmington Messenger, September 27, 1889.

      48 D. H. Hill to Kinstrung (October 30, 1858), College Archives, Davidson College Library, Davidson, N.C.

      49 Fishburne, p. 1.

      50 Ibid.

      51 Ibid., p. 3.

      52 Minutes of the Board of Trustees of Davidson College (August 10, 1853), College Archives, Davidson College Library, Davidson, N.C. Hereafter cited as Davidson College Board of Trustees.

      53 Discipline, p.4.

      54 Major D. H. Hill, College Discipline. An Inaugural Address Delivered At Davidson College, N.C., On the 28th February, 1855 (Watchman Office, 1855), p. 3. Hereafter cited as Address. Davidson College Board of Trustees October 15, 1853).

      55 Fishburne, p. 8.

      56 Fishburne, p. 7.

      57 Davidson College Board of Trustees (August 8, 1854). The report of the Faculty stated that there had been 90 students at Davidson College during the previous term.

      58 Davidson College Board of Trustees (February 21, 1854).

      59 Minutes of the Faculty of Davidson College (April 24, 1854), College Archives, Davidson College Library, Davidson, N.C. Hereafter cited as Davidson College Faculty.

      60 For a detailed history of Davidson College, see Mary D. Beaty, A History of Davidson College (Briarpatch Press, 1988).

      61 Discipline, p. 6.

      62 Discipline, p. 10.

      63 Davidson College Board of Trustees (April 8, 1854).

      64 Davidson College Faculty, (June 12, July 10, 1854).

      65 Ibid. (April 24, 1855).

      66 Ibid (February 8, 1858).

      67 Ibid (February 19, 1858).

      68 Ibid. (May 5, 1855).

      69 Ibid. (January 2, 1855).

      70 Ibid.

      71 Discipline, p. 14.

      72 Ibid. p. 11.

      73 Ibid.

      74 D. H. Hill, A Consideration Of The Sermon On The Mount (William S. & Alfred Martien, 1858), p. 7.

      75 Discipline, p. 12.

      76 Address.

      77 Bridges, p. 151.

      78 Quoted in Beaty, p. 60.

      79 Davidson College Board of Trustees (July 11, 1859).

      80 Public Laws Of The State Of North Carolina, Passed By The General Assembly At Its Session Of 1858-9: Together With The Comptroller's Statement Of Public Revenue And Expenditure (Holden and Wilson, 1859), p. 72. Hereafter cited as Public Laws.

      81 Ibid., p. 73.

      82 Ibid.

      83 Western Democrat, June 29, 1853.

      84 Ibid., September 28, 1853.

      85 The General Statutes list the following individuals as the Board of Trustees of the North Carolina Military Institute: Charles J. Fox, James H. Carson, H. Laff Alexander, T. H. Brim, James P. Invire, S. M. Blair, David Parks, James H. Davis, Moses Heart, John A. Young, J. M. Davidson, and J. H. Wayte (Public Laws, p. 384). This writer believes that 'James P. Invire' was James P. Irwin, Hill's brother-in-law, and 'T. H. Brim' was T. H. Brem.

      86 Ibid., June 29, 1853.

      87 The only other military institute in North Carolina, also a private school, was in Hillsborough.

      88 Stweard's Hall was 270 feet long (Western Democrat, June 29, 1853). This writer believes it was the largest building in Charlotte when it was erected.

      89 Ibid., August 3, 1858.

      90 The campus was located about where the Charlotte Central Y.M.C.A. now stands on East Morehead Street. Steward's Hall faced west, and the front door was somewhere in the present right-of-way of South Boulevard. The parade ground, where cadets practiced infantry tactics and fired artillery pieces daily, extended from the front of Steward's Hall down the hill to the edge of the railroad tracks that still run parallel to South Boulevard and South Tryon Street.

      91 Ibid., January 15, 1861.

      92 Ibid., September 6, 1858.

      93 Ibid.

      94 Henry E. Shepherd, Gen. D. H. Hill -- A Character Sketch (College Archives, Davidson College Library, Davidson, N.C.). According to Shepherd, some of the weapons that were taken when John Brown was captured in Harper's Ferry, Va. in 1859 were brought and stored in the arsenal of the North Carolina Military Institute.

      95 Ratchford, p. 5.

      96 Major D. H. Hill, A Consideration Of The Sermon On The Mount (William S. & Alfred Martien, 1858), p. 20.

      97 Western Democrat, April 2, 1861.

      98 Ratchford, pp. 5-6.

      99 Speech delivered at Auburn, Alabama by General Lane. College Archives, Davidson College Library, Davidson, N.C.